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The Mythical Man-Month: Essays on Software Engineering

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Comments and mentions from HN threads:

Ask HN: What books do you wish your manager would read?


GFischer: To make him understand how a programming system costs a lot more than a simple module.

Mentions by: a3n : koja86 : jrochkind1

Ask HN: Are there any books that inspire or highly influence the way you work?


Jtsummers: Very informative series of essays on his experiences and lessons learned with IBM. If nothing else, helps to properly frame my expectations on projects with respect to resources needed to properly coordinate with others, and the pros and cons of adding people to projects at different stages (and in different roles).

Mentions by: mitchelldeacon9

Ask HN: What's the best computer science book you've read recently?


johntran: It was written 40 years ago, but it is still relevant to today. Its so important to think about how to build effective engineering teams.

ereyes01: One of the most important books ever written on software engineering practice. Author Frederick Brooks won the Turing Award for this book and for his work on IBM's System/360 (the main example project used in the book).

Ask HN: What language-agnostic programming books should I read?


eckza: ...is a must-read, for anyone that wants to effectively engage in the software development lifecycle, IMO. Developer, project manager, doesn't matter.

Mentions by: binarymax : OliverJones : joshdev : mathnode : eru

Ask HN: What are the books you wish your colleagues had read?


qilisiang: To all Project Managers & Top Management.

Mentions by: conjecTech : emmelaich

Ask HN: Recommendations on books and documentaries on tech companies/people?


sizzzzlerz: A classic book of software engineering but it is so much more. If you have aspirations of becoming an effective manager, you need this book.

Ask HN: Favorite books on how to be a good manager?


sixhobbits: Definitely still a must-read decades after it was first published (get the 20th anniversary edition as it has a nice summary at the end, including where the author thinks he was right and where he admits freely what he got wrong).