shawn: I think it's a good one because it's a mix of analysis and history. Thiel had a unique vantage point, and he shares it well. It also challenges you to be ambitious, which is becoming a rare sentiment. read comments

krschultz: I'm not a startup founder, but I've been in a couple startups. It's really easy to say what the founders should have done (especially in hindsight). This book helped me understand the burden a bit more. read comments

beat: The best work you do is the work you find you don't need to do. Learn how to fail fast and save time on projects and product development, by building what customers want... read comments

darkerside: Timeless principles that boil down the ABCs of being an effective manager. No bells and whistles. This is a must-read for any new manager. read comments

CodyReichert: If you're a fan of 37 Signals and/or DHH, this is a succinct and enjoyable read about their principles on building and running a business. read comments

rckrd: Founders at Work was phenomenal. Its a collection of interviews with early startup founders where Jessica Livingston asks great, probing questions. An excellent example of how to conduct... read comments

hello_newman: It really opened my mind to so many fascinating mental constructs. I’ve probably read a half a dozen times and take something new from it each time I re-read it. read comments

hga: Ah, for startups in general, you should look at The E-Myth by Michael Gerber, no matter what you're doing it'll have some essential advice, and you should examine your business model in the light of... read comments

lpolovets : Engineer-friendy guide to marketing and growth read comments

mindcrime: I've learned more about "what goes into building a startup" from reading this book than any other book I've read. read comments

Simorgh: This book details the tumultuous roller-coaster ride that was the early days of Twitter. I feel it is an essential read to truly understand the mentality, minds and drive of many within the start-up world. read comments

akulbe: If this book existed before I started college, I'd have read this and skipped the business major! read comments

williamstein: His books explain some of the "deeper structure" to tech business, and is one of the few business-related books I've read that has any depth. By "depth", I mean in the sense that... read comments

Jugurtha: For those put off by the title, Felix Dennis is/was a billionaire and makes a point of differentiating himself from people becoming wealthy giving advice about how to become wealthy. read comments

portman: Over the span of a few decades, a single research lab invented the transistor, the microprocessor, radar, the communication satellite, the CD, and more. read comments

erikstarck: Goes in to detail on the psychology of the pitch. It talks about the concept of framing and how you must control the frame to close the deal. Highly recommended. read comments