BFatts: A fantastic language-agnostic manual that still applies heavily today. read comments

beat: Not creepy at all, despite how the title sounds in today's language. This book is the bible of how to get along with others. It's been in continuous print since before WWII, for good reason. read comments

beat: The best work you do is the work you find you don't need to do. Learn how to fail fast and save time on projects and product development, by building what customers want... read comments

HeckFeck: If you're interested in something closer to the hardware than Python, why not read about the language that implements Python? It's a programming classic, very concise, easy to read and... read comments

IanCal: A stunningly good book about cognitive biases, with fairly understated claims and backed up with studies. Excellent advice for life and it's changed how I view decisions and interactions. read comments

jonathansorum: Meditations easily has my highest rate of highlighted words in relation to total book length. Seems like every page (almost) has some eternal and profound in it. read comments

shawn: I think it's a good one because it's a mix of analysis and history. Thiel had a unique vantage point, and he shares it well. It also challenges you to be ambitious, which is becoming a rare sentiment. read comments

JSeymourATL: Turns out the creator of Dilbert was at one time a mid-senior level manager in Corporate America, who attempted several failed entrepreneurial ventures over the years. He's also a brilliant writer. read comments

combatentropy: I always enjoyed writing, but at first school taught me to write in a flowery, longwinded way. This was the book that cracked the code for me to good writing. It dispelled a lot of self-serving... read comments

DanHulton: One of the best books on programming style and function, backed up with actual research for the recommendations. read comments

doyoulikeworms: Over time I've appreciated it as a way to both motivate me to work towards success, and also to cope with feeling not successful enough. The fact reflecting on that book is helpful for... read comments

mindcrime: The successor to the famous The Four Steps to the Epiphany, this is the Bible of Customer Development. read comments