mindcrime: Just a fascinating story of a strangely interesting man. Lots of computer industry history embedded in here as well. read comments

IanCal: A stunningly good book about cognitive biases, with fairly understated claims and backed up with studies. Excellent advice for life and it's changed how I view decisions and interactions. read comments

_8usx: The book is full of excellent anecdotes on the joys and consequences of sincere curiosity. To this day it still inspires me to ask "What is behind x/ if I push/pull/turn/fuzz this x" and... read comments

mindcrime: The successor to the famous The Four Steps to the Epiphany, this is the Bible of Customer Development. read comments

xiaoma: It's the result of years of his research on the process a human goes through to achieve mastery in a field. It breaks the process down to key components and stages and examines masters of... read comments

green7ea: Shogun is an awesome read; I read it yearly. The many interleaving and embedded plots create fascinating character depth. Not only that but Clavel easily transitions between the point of view of... read comments

mck-: What a unique masterpiece. Covers a wide range fascinating concepts through the three geniuses in Math, Art, and Music... read comments

elliottcarlson: An excellent story that really made me nostalgic to my younger years - definitely recommend this one. read comments

gammarator: Can a normal person become a memory champion? Joshua Foer covers a lot of ground in this well-written book, including extensive historical background as well as... read comments

beat: The best work you do is the work you find you don't need to do. Learn how to fail fast and save time on projects and product development, by building what customers want... read comments

Isinlor: This is how I got really hooked up to triathlon and ultramarathons. Great book, I lent it to many people and changed some of their lives too. read comments

portman: Weaves together baseball, earthquakes, the weather, poker, and terrorism. Chapter 7 is the best description of Bayes theoreom I've ever read. read comments

beat: Not creepy at all, despite how the title sounds in today's language. This book is the bible of how to get along with others. It's been in continuous print since before WWII, for good reason. read comments

prashnts: This book contains tales of some of the Sacks's patients. A very interesting read. read comments

Jugurtha: For those put off by the title, Felix Dennis is/was a billionaire and makes a point of differentiating himself from people becoming wealthy giving advice about how to become wealthy. read comments

vishnugupta: This is truly a magnum opus. Until I read this I had taken money, economy, market etc., for granted. And I had held onto the widely accepted, but naive, view that economic systems... read comments